Great Advice from Eight Hospitality Wizards for those Looking to Make a Career in Hospitality

Tue 06 2018  |  Adaya

Ollie Dabbous of Dabbous and HIDE, Andie Limon of Scotch + Limon, Andy Waugh of Mac & Wild – Want to know how they got where they are? Whether you’re a budding Chef, Bartender or Restauranter – here’s some invaluable expert advice for you from eight fantastic individuals who’ve made their mark on the London hospitality industry with their dedication –

MASTER MIXOLOGIST: RUSSELL BURGESS

Q. If you could give one very important tip to a budding bartender, what would it be?

Well its all a combination of learning on the job whilst also reading up on cocktail knowledge. Nail the basics and then don’t be shy to try some experimentation.
Read, read and read! Jerry Thomas has some great stuff on the basics then there’s an excellent book called ‘The Fine Art of Mixing’ by David Embury; a must-read!

 

FABRICE LIMON FROM SCOTCH + LIMON

Q. If you could give one very important tip to a budding bartender, what would it be?

Never ever lose eye contact with your customers. One thing I realised as a young bartender on a busy bar, as soon as you lose track of who was where in the line then you’re done for. A quick nod of acknowledgement in the Customers direction makes them relax and helps people to get on with enjoying their night knowing you got them, rather than stressing on when they’re gonna get a drink!

 

CARLO CARELLO FROM ALBERT’S PRIVATE MEMBERS CLUB

Q. If you could give one very important tip to a someone interviewing to work at a high-end venue, what would it be?

Turn up on time and dress nicely! Make sure you have read up about the venue and what the concept is etc. We recently interviewed someone who thought Albert’s was a pub! Not a good start! Knowledge is so important and makes a great first impression.

Never lie on your CV and make sure your have clean nails and fresh breath 😉

 

GORDON KER FROM BLACKLOCK SOHO

Q. If you could give one very important tip to a budding restauranterer, what would it be?

Be aware! There are long hours, its very hard and there are lots of moving variables so its not like if you’ve created the Dyson hoover and every time you sell one its always the same.

There can be issues with suppliers or with chefs cooking something over a charcoal grill, there’s always that margin for error when a dish is served so be prepared for it to be very hard but it’s very rewarding if it all goes okay. And it’s certainly better than being a lawyer!

 

ANDY WAUGH OF MAC&WILD FAME

Q. If you could give one very important tip to a budding chef, what would it be?

Find a mentor! Dont need to have an end goal but have a reason why you’re doing it. Even if its vague – “I want to cook in a michelin star restaurant” for example, or “I want to change the eating patterns of the nation”. Whatever it may be, just make sure you have a goal!
And don’t just plod along in the same old place. Whilst consistency in a role is key, it’s also great to challenge yourself in different positions

 

OLLIE DABBOUS

IF YOU COULD GIVE ONE VERY IMPORTANT TIP TO A BUDDING CHEF, WHAT WOULD IT BE?
Taste everything.

 

MATT EMMERSON FROM PERILLA DINING

Q. If you could give one very important tip to someone interviewing to work at your venue, what would it be?

Three points:

I guess having a real passion for food and drink and not to be nervous, just being calm and having your head screwed, and lastly being charming or cheeky. Not giving off the impression that you get flustered easily. Always helps.

 

MICAELA PHILIPPO, CREATIVE DIRECTOR, PACHAMAMA RESTAURANT GROUP

Q. If you could give one very important tip to someone looking to work in hospitality, what would it be?

Be confident, your job is to be a performer, an actor and a very discreet salesperson. There’s nothing worse than foh staff that have no personality. Also, working in hospitality you should take an interest in food & drink generally. I never understand people that work in restaurants but don’t eat in restaurants.